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20121201
20121231
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the victors of the war. hitler had invaded germany in 1941, and they fought back against the germans, and they kept going against berlin. >> define stalinism. >> stalinism was a developed system of control. it believed it could control everything, not only in politics and economics but social life, civic life, sports clubs and chess clubs. in the stalinist system, there were no independent institutions of any kind. no independent voices of any kind were allowed to speak. all the economy was under state control, and all of society was. there was a cultural aspect, too. the arts were under stalinist control, and there was a cold of stalin himself. his portrait hung everywhere. there was a cult of stalin himself. >> i grew up in a small town of indiana, and one of my streets, you talk about radio casuth. >> he was was a hungarian hero of an earlier time. there was a radio, and they adopted the name of a previous deliberate thing hero, and in 1956 he would have to call it anti-stalinist radio. >> what was the circumstance? >> 56 is the end of the stalinist period. he died in 53, and afte
germany in 1941, and they fought back against the germans, and they kept going against berlin. >> the fine stalinism. >> stalinism was developed system,-- define stalinism. >> stalinism was a developed system of control. it believed it could control everything, not only in politics and economics but social life, civic life, sports clubs and chess clubs. in the stalinist system, there were no independent institutions of any kind. no independent voices of any kind were allowed to speak. all the economy was under state control, and all of society was. there was a cultural aspect, too. the arts were under stalinist control, and there was a cold of stalin himself. his portrait hung everywhere. -- there was a cult of stalin himself. >> i grew up in a small town of indiana, and one of my streets, you talk about radio casuth. \ >> he was the hon gary and hero of an earlier time, and much later on, -- he was often gering and hero of an earlier time, -- was a hungarian hero of an earlier time. there was a radio, and they adopted the name of a previous deliberate thing hero, and in 1956 he would have
are as different as germany and greece. what is it that keeps the united states together? you had a great depression here in the 1930's. things were awful. and yet, i do not believe there were any political movements to get rid of the deficit states from the united states, like there are in europe and portugal and spain and everywhere else that happens to be in deficit. the reason is, the federal- state, especially after 1929 plays the role of the regulator of surplus and deficit recycling around the land. let me give you a simple example. we are in seattle. boeing is sponsoring the lectures. when boeing goes to washington to give a contract for the next generation jet or whatever, they may get it. they do get it. but there are some things attached. like for instance, we want a factory that builds the wings are the engines in tennessee or missouri or arizona. in the deficit regions. this is not philanthropy. this is an act of recycling surplus so the surpluses of the surplus state can continue to be created, produced. you may recall that in the 1920s, internationally, we had a gold stand
democrats i chose to poland, hungary, and east germany. they have different historical background. they belong to different empires in the 19th century. they have different political traditions and mostly because they have given experiences of the war. germany was nazi germany. poland resisted very strongly. the nazis had one of the most resistant movements in europe. the hon variants were different. hungarians- the were different. i was interested in how did they react and the subsequent process of sovietization. >> how would you describe the situation in the country's today, the lifestyle, the economy, the openness to democracy and all that? >> all of them are democracies. east germany is not east germany. it is part of germany, so it is indistinguishable. west germany is poorer in some ways than poland, a country that has recovered more vigorously than the eastern part of germany. poland is a very vibrant democracy, maybe to vibrant -- too vibrant, but it plays a very important and central role in europe. it is a member of nato. it is the largest of the former east european cou
assume you were talking about soviet russia and nazi germany. were these regimes possible because of the uniformity? if that is the case, how did the myriad number of protestant denominations in the united states provide a unique defense against tyranny? >> i would not say -- i was not referring to just the soviet union and nazi germany. communist china killed far more of those two tyrannies combined, with no christian heritage to speak of. there are serious scholars that makes serious arguments that there is something and luther's temperament that was germanic. he was no democrat. the more, the merrier. religious factions or alternative sources of social authority. what you want is a society in which the state does not monopolized social authority. >> you talked extensively about religion in the united states contributing to [inaudible] there is one particular force that think they can inflict their views on this country. they insist said it was the intention of the founding fathers to create a christian equivalent of iran, which i do not think is the case. just because you are r
to germany and japan. an astonishing number. 70% of the profits in the country were recycled into europe and japan. the marshall plan is a very small target. i will not bore you with details. when they go to washington, it is not a philanthropic act on the pentagon's part. the united states federal government -- unless europe is dollar rise, unless they do not have dollars to spend purchasing the net exports of those who have surpluses, then they will stop having surplus. this is the surplus recycling mechanism. thus, we have the 20 years of the golden age. a period of immense stability very low inflation. universal growth. we had other problems. the lease from the macroeconomic point of view, it was a golden age. why is that? because the global surplus of recycling mechanism was sustained. why? because the united states stopped having a surplus by the end of the 1960's. how can you recycle surplus if you cannot have it. well, paul volcker -- been named may ring a bell. in 1971, paul volcker was an unknown working for another american. henry kissinger, who you may have heard of. before h
germany. were these regimes possible because of the uniformity? if that is the case, how did the myriad number of protestant denominations in the united states provide a unique defense against tyranny? >> i would not say -- i was not referring to just the soviet union and nazi germany. communist china killed far more of those two tyrannies combined, with no christian heritage to speak of. there are serious scholars that makes serious arguments that there is something and luther's temperament that was germanic. he was no democrat. the more, the merrier. religious factions or alternative sources of social authority. what you want is a society in which the state does not monopolized social authority. >> you talked extensively about religion in the united states contributing to [inaudible] there is one particular force that think they can inflict their views on this country. they insist said it was the intention of the founding fathers to create a christian equivalent of iran, which i do not think is the case. just because you are religious, it does not make you write all the time. >> get i
" and "homeland" are popular not just in germany and u.k. but in jordan and turkey. "24" is a huge hit in iran. it's beamed in illegally by -- you're not getting paid for it? >> no. but i do think. >> but it's smuggled in a lot. the actor is persian and has a lot of connections in iran and he's been tracking "homeland" in iran. >> it is stuningly popular but i've read a few criticisms of the show and to the extent that we make piss people off on every side of the aisle and are embraced by them too is a good thing. one thing i did learn is that as an export, as a public face, we do have some responsibility, some influence on -- this is an american export and we are good at this. we make really good movies and television shows. it is what the world sees of us. and there was a book by a researcher at the gallop organization and they polled people in egypt what is your feeling about americans. i don't like america but i like americans. and a very small percentage had never met an american. and they said how dow know and the answer was "friends". >> based on that i like america too. >> politics dem nie
surpluses to germany and japan. an astonishing number. 70% of the profits in the country were recycled into europe and japan. the marshall plan is a very small target. i will not bore you with details. when they go to washington, it is not an act of philanthropic on the pentagon -- and at the plant for be on the pentagon fell apart -- it is not a philanthropic act on the pentagon's part. the united states federal government -- unless europe is dollar rise, unless they do not have dollars to spend purchasing the net exports of those who have surpluses, then they will stop having surplus. this is the surplus recycling mechanism. thus, we have the 20 years of the golden age. a period of immense stability very low inflation. universal growth. we had other problems. the lease from the macroeconomic point of view, it was a golden age. why is that? because the global surplus of recycling mechanism was sustained. why? because the united states stopped having a surplus by the end of the 1960's. how can you recycle surplus if you cannot have it. well, paul volcker -- been named may ring a bell.
of 8 months to the next federal election in germany, for instance. greece therefore is the sick person europe. of the world. meanwhile, the united states of america is ungovernable. you have a system in this country that was created to create this country as an ungovernable state. you have congress, the president canceling each other out. how the president -- whoever the president might be -- do anything? you have china -- finding it impossible to provide a replacement for the demand that the west has done away with. so, i do not have an answer for your question. bewilderment. >> my question is about consumer demand and the extent to which the old system depended on it. if we do not have it to the same degree, could there possibly be a new economy? i cannot know how to say all of these in the right economic terms. i will say what i am thinking and see what you make out of it. its teams like all the economy's got to a point where it had to be based on growth. it could not just be sustainable. it had to grow. and that meant more consumers. so, then, that led to a lot of things ecological
. it was the same with east germany and west germany, the collapse of warsaw and the soviet empire. it was economic issues. i think the same today with the palestinians. it is impossible to be a non- democratic country if you have real gdp per capita of $10,000. you cannot explain what is democracy to a country like yemen with gdp per capita less than $1,000. half the population is completely illiterate and you have two hundred tribes. explain to them who is full terror and a jean-jacques terror and a jean-jacques rousseau and what is the great
china, germany, brazil. tavis that transform the way we think about education? do you think your role as straining american leaders? are you looking at attracting global leaders? >> there are so many questions. let me address a few of them. there are numerous kind of statistics that we have a preeminence of college graduates in our populations and levels of participation. we are losing this. we have once last three of the world's college graduates. that is an interesting illustration of a shift in the dynamism. i see this when i travel. a huge commitment to public resources. huge energy to enthusiasm of higher education. india wants 1500 new universities by 2020. alicia's in a meeting about hong kong this week. i learned that hong kong university is expanding undergraduate education from three years to four years because they think it is not giving students enough time. there are all these buildings going up. here we are being told in the united states that maybe we should reduce ourselves from four years to three years. another aspect. let me insert here so much of what our discussio
is it that germany, a country that has 1/4 of the population of the united states, exports more than what the united states does? because if you look at our tax code, that's broken, it needs reform, industries in the united states that are employing americans are given two-year tax credits and we expect those american companies to make generational commitments on a two-year tax credit. you look at places like germany, they're providing 10-year tax credits that sends a signal, a signal of certainty, a signal of clarity to businesses in germany, that there is a commitment to embrace innovation and technology, to remain competitive in the manufacturing economy. manufacturing today is not labor-intensive. it's capital-intensive. you always have to be in a continuous improvement mode. but that requires one thing. it requires a confidence in the american people, a confidence in the american worker, in making the kind of commitments that are necessary to compete with china. i often hear people on this floor, every day, whining about china. yeah, china cheats on their currency. they treat their workers poor
. but a dog knows absolutely instantly when -- instantly. when we lived in germany -- germany, my father was working there, all the police had trained doings on the place and there were no robberies, there were no assaults because people knew that that dog would get them and obviously the security is not working. and children need to be protected. adults need to be protected. and it would be much less expensive and much safer to have a trained dog in every school and the malls and big theater complexes. host: ok, sara, we got your point. john? guest: i'm not sure if it would be less expensive to have a handler and a dog at every school rather than allowing one person to possess a gun they probably own pivetly, having said that, it's an unfortunate fact i grew up much of my early years in europe and you know, i understand that they had strict gun control laws there. until last friday, the newtown shoot, the top three, in terms of fatality, school shootings in the world were in britain and germany. those were done with assault weapons. just because you have strict gun controls doesn't mean
heard anything at all? >> "24" and "homeland" are popular not just in germany and u.k. but in jordan and turkey. "24" is a huge hit in iran. --s beamed in illegally by you're not getting paid for it? >> no. but i do think. >> but it's smuggled in a lot. the actor is persian and has a lot of connections in iran and he's been tracking "homeland" in iran. >> it is stunningly popular but i've read a few criticisms of the show and to the extent that we make piss people off on every side of the aisle and are embraced by them too is a good thing. one thing i did learn is that as an export, as a public face, we do have some responsibility, some influence on -- this is an american export and we are good at this. we make really good movies and television shows. it is what the world sees of us. and there was a book by a researcher at the gallop organization and they polled people in egypt what is your feeling about americans. i don't like america but i like americans. and a very small percentage had never met an american. and they said how dow know and the answer was "friends". >> based on that
with an average of 182 in germany. 10,000 987 compared with an average of 182 in germany, 75 in spain and 47 in the united kingdom. mexico, their average about 5,980 annual homicides, still half of ours by firearms during that same period. colombia was higher. an executive director of the chicago crime lab has said that this is an outliar and lethal violence. other countries have similar rates of rape and battery but said because so much american violence includes guns, includes guns, the rate of death of so much higher. steady gun violence leads especially, young blacks and latino men are likely to die in a shooting. each year from 2006 to 2010, homicide is the leading cause of death for african-american males from ages 15 to 24 more than the next nine causes of death combined according to the ces for disease control and prevention. gun violence is part of a complex cycle born of poverty and residential segregation as is poor health and substandard education, which all are related to the poverty and the persistent gun violence. challenges that the nation has yet to truly face and address. a
to europe first. the policy of germany first then japan had to be worked out. which is why churchill was in washington that month. i think americans always liked churchill. he had been speaking in america for 20 years. was american. guest: his mother was american. he was well known on the lecture circuit and now here he is as prime minister. they were familiar with him. i think he came out of that speech that day knowing he had an ally and americans took a liking to him because they were very wary of churchill that all he wanted were his colonies become. b not liberty or not roosevelt's four freedoms but to recapture everything the japanese had taken from him by using american boys and that americans resented and they were wary of that host: we are about out of time. when did you finish this? guest: early this year? host: early 2012? guest: yes. and about six months of copy editing and final editing with bill phillips. host: out of all the characters in it besides winston chump if you were -- churchill if you were going it write another book who would it be? guest: admiral king come
to your first. the policy of germany first, then japan had be worked out, which is why churchill was in washington that month. i think americans like to churchill. >> his mom was american. >> his mom was american. he was well-known on the lecture circuit. now here he is prime minister. they were familiar with him. i think he came out of that speech that day knowing americans took a liking to him because they were very wary -- and still were many -- that all they wanted were the colonies back. not liberty. not war freedoms. to recapture everything the japanese had taken from them by using american boys. and that americans resented. they were wary of that. as well as george marshall. >> we are about out of time. when did you finish this? >> this is about -- early this year? >> early 2012? >> yes. about six months of copyediting and final editing with bill. >> out of all of the characters in at the sides winston churchill, if you were going to write another book, who would it be? >> well, admiral king resigned. and nod to my dad, who was a navy guy. fascinating character. >> will yo
, when eastern germany and eastern europe. from her historical narrative on the iron curtain tonight at 8:00 on c-span's q&a. host: we are joined by matt kibbe, president and ceo of freedomworks. . seeing some speculation that speaker boehner may be willing to talk about taxes. what do you think speaker boehner needs to do? how much confidence do you have in representing the republican party perspective? guest: taxes will go up automatically. spending, the sequester, will happen unless republicans act. it is literally true that republicans do not have the ability to stop all the tax increases unless the president goes along with it. that said, taxes will only go up when it is a bipartisan solution. they need republicans to raise taxes. i think john boehner would make a huge mistake in raising taxes. we need to change the conversation and get rid of all the credit capitalism in the tax code. let's not do this in the discussion of punishing some people. host: what the think of the speaker's role in these negotiations? how does freedomworks feel about the agenda he's bringing to the table? h
instantly. all the police in germany had trained dogs on the street. there were no robberies or assaults because people know that the dog would get them. the security is not working. children and adults need to be protected. it would be safer to have trained dogs in every school and the malls and big theater complexes. host: we got your points. guest: i am not sure it would be less expensive to have a handle and a dog. i grew up much of my life in europe. i understand they have strict gun control laws there. the top three in terms of fatalities until friday were in britain and germany. those were often used with assault weapons. people can get access to these weapons. host: this comes from twitter. there were some graphics this morning from "the washington post." the ban on assault weapons includes massachusetts, maryland, new york, and hawaii. 30 states require -- host: what do you make of the mental health requirements and awaiting periods? what about tightening those laws? guest: i think they will be on the table. there is probably a loophole in the system. on the concealed carry issu
, her son raymond was killed in the korean war while a third son served in west germany in the same war. no mother should have to lose two sons to war. but her family's sacrifice will forever be part of history and i ask that we pass this bill with no reservation. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady reserves. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. farenthold: thank you, mr. speaker. at this time i yield such time as he may consume to my distinguished colleague from the state of michigan, mr. benishek. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognize. mr. benishek: i come to the floor today to urge my colleagues to support my legislation, h.r. 4378, a bill to name the post office building in munising, michigan, after the late mrs. elizabeth kinnunen. her story is that like many across this nation, she came to america as an immigrant to to have a better life. she came to the united states in 1903 and married oscar in 1909. they had seven children and worked hard all their life to ensure their children would have a shot at the american dream. t
. the next highest was france and germany. united king come 9.6. and germany and france on many measures are getting better healthcare out comes than we are. and we know if you fast forward to 2012 we're not spending that, we're over 18%. 1 in every 6 dollars in this economy is going to healthcare. and however much one saves on healthcare, 40% of that flows through to the federal government because the federal government is paying 40% of healthcare in this country, actually something more than that. there is lots of room to save money in this healthcare system and there by save money in medicare and medicaid. we're talking about a very small percentage about what we intend to spend over the next ten years in the savings that are being discussed. the same is true on discretionary savings. the president called for $200 billion. but if we put it in perspective we're going to spend in the domestic accounts in the next ten years $11.6 trillion. so a $200 billion savings is 1.7% of what we're forecast to spend. thanally can't save less 2%? of course we can. i think we've as a country, both sid
the kind of transition you had in germany? today germany is to lay prosperous country. will south korea consider the north koreans to be their cousins and brothers? there is a huge disparity at this point. you can see the physical difference because of the questions of nutrition and the way they are raised. is a total state based on fear. the challenge is to figure out how to absorb water looking like two or three lost generations. host: foreign policy in review with eli lake. you can give us a call. 202-585-3881 for republicans. 202-585-3880 for democrats. 202-585-3882 for independen ts. you can send us the tweet or e- mail, f twitter.com/cspanwj, journal@c-span.org. john kerry for secretary of state and chuck cale for secretary of defense -- chuck hayes cogel. how will these nominations go/ guest: chuck hagel has not been nominated yet. john kerry was announced by the white house on friday. the fact that kerry was announced does not bode well for the trial balloon of chalk .eguck hagel we have seen john mccain say they are going to vote for him. chuck hagel has been questioned by a nu
protect their own ground forces? is there something about germany and italy and france and spain and england and japan that renders them genetically incapable of having their own air forces? i know we were told, well, we have to stay in iraq and afghanistan because they don't have any air force. well, neither do the people attacking them. the next thing we are told is, well, we need to protect the u.s. from a nuclear attack. i agree. we have a nuclear capacity that far exceeds any potential combination of enemies. we had during the height of the cold war the triad. we could destroy the soviet union and they had a capacity to go after us by missiles, submarines or the strategic air command. i have a proposal, sometimes i'm kidding, this time i'm not. can we not go to the pentagon and say, you know what? now that there is no more soviet union, there is a much weaker russia, and i agree, russia won a war against georgia. they won a war against the country of georgia. i think the way we have armed the state of georgia, i'm not sure what the outcome would be if that was the war. but r
. these countries no longer have much in common with one another. >> more about life in soviet east germany from the end of world war ii through 1956 from her historical narrative, sunday night at 8:00 on c-span. >> "washington journal" continues. host: we want to welcome sarah kliff, a health care reporter with "the washington post." as we continue our series, we want to take a look at different aspects of what we can expect as we face the january 1 deadline. we want to talk about the said likely the doc fix. many people say you have to understand the doc fix. guest: it is something we have had since about a decade ago. back in 1997, congress set a formula for how to pay doc fares. it worked for about five years until the cost of health care started growing. what we have seen every year is congress passed a temporary pay patch to make up the difference. every year, we get to the end of the year and there is this in. gap. right now if we do not pass it, medicare salaries will go down by 25%. everyone thinks the doc fix is not a good idea and we should fix it permanently. it is something that we
laws. guest: i do not think that will solve the problem. germany has the strongest gun- control laws in the world paying big in chin. in china, individuals cannot own any arms. we have the same kinds of violent situations going on. in connecticut they had some of the strongest gun-control laws in the country and it still occurred there. let's look at the problems that caused this to occur. let's focus on solving those problems instead of just saying it is guns. right now today in connecticut, also weapons -- an assault weapon is a machine gun. they are already controlled. someone cannot just go to the store and buy an assault weapon today. it is not about clips or number of rounds in a gun. we have to focus upon those problems that caused this young man to snap, to kill his mom. i cannot imagine that. and then go and kill six-year oldss. the guns did not make him do that. the guns were not evil. he is evil, his act is evil. we need to deal with what caused the problems. i don't think the guns caused it. host: back to your home state of georgia, james is on the phone on the independen
, and germany, israel or china. there is a committee on foreign investment in the united states. out of the hundreds of billions of dollars a year of direct investment coming into the united states involving thousands of transactions, only about 100 per year are reviewed by the united states government, and only about six or seven of those involved chinese companies. and out of the hundred that the united states reviews, only about 6%-7% are ever modified. so, the vast majority of investment coming into the united states is not problematic. we very much welcome that. in fact, we at the embassy just posted a huge ambassadors' forum on investment in to the united states, to which we had attending about 80 of the top chinese entrepreneurs and investors. we had about 24 different states making presentations and showcasing a whole list of different products and opportunities for investment in those states, from real estate to food processing plants, high- tech firms, biotech firms looking for investment and for capital. we very much welcome chinese investment, especially in factories that
the promise of the strategy, which has been used in germany, of the national manufacturing innovation hubs. that is something we will to promote in a second term and expand further. >> over here. >> thank you. every child matters. i applaud you for your comments about the need not to have less having money for children versus money for research and other vital needs in the domestic discretionary budget. the question is, where do we find more revenue? and have you considered taxes on stock transfers and stock transactions or other kinds of innovative -- carbon taxes, other kinds of approaches where we can find new revenue that it would be possible for us to have amongst ourselves for important resources? >> it is going to shock you to know that i'm not here to make news on a new revenues. [laughter] we are busy fighting right now to make sure that we have a budget agreement that is very balanced, and part of that balance is having enough high income revenues together with smart entitlement savings. that is the balance that people talk about the most. the other balances to make sure that you
. they no longer have much in common with one another. >> more on life and soviet east germany sunday night at 8:00 on c-span's "q&a." >> punched me, to me, take things from me. >> he is not safe on that bus. >> i have been on that bus and they are as good as gold. >> all of us were starting to see people coming out and talking about their experience of this phenomenon that so many of us have experienced in one way or another and have no words for, other than adolescents. finally, people are starting to stand back and say, this is not actually a normal part of growing up. this is not a normal right of passage. there was a moment where there was a possibility for change. we decided to start the film out of that feeling that voices were bubbling up. coming up to the surface to say, this is not something we can accept any more as a normal part of our culture. >> the filmmaker has followed up for award winning film by gathering essays. -- her toward women -- her award winning film by gathering essays. >> the fiscal cliff negotiations, with particular attention to social security. we spoke to an asso
for the common memory of communist occupation. >> more with an applebaum in germany.soviet eastern m -- anne applebaum. that is a big night at 8:00 on c-span "q&a." >> now, latino leaders discuss issues that may impact of latino generation. panelists include former white house advisor to latin -- latin america, executive director of the latino partnership for conservative principles, and arizona state university professor rodolfo espinoza. this event is two hours. >> good morning. we will go ahead and get started. welcome to the wilson center. this is, as you well know, a place where public policy and a research me to bring together the world of ideas with your world a policy action. very happy to have our director of the latin-american program. and of course, very pleased that this is an event we are co- sponsoring with immigration works that did most of the work for this. the president of emigration works really put the panel together, as well as very proud to co-concert arizona university. i want to acknowledge a senior scholar at the woodrow wilson center. and many other good friends her
gross domestic product on healthcare. the next highest was france and germany. united king come 9.6. and germany and france on many measures are getting better healthcare out comes than we are. and we know if you fast forward to 2012 we're not spending that, we're over 18%. 1 in every 6 dollars in this economy is going to healthcare. and however much one saves on healthcare, 40% of that flows through to the federal government because the federal government is paying 40% of healthcare in this country, actually something more than that. there is lots of room to save money in this healthcare system and there by save money in medicare and medicaid. we're talking about a very small percentage about what we intend to spend over the next ten years in the savings that are being discussed. the same is true on discretionary savings. the president called for $200 billion. discretionary savings on top of the billion that has been done. but if we put it in perspective we're going to spend in the domestic accounts in the next ten years $11.6 trillion. so a $200 billion savings is 1.7% of what w
services, germany, ms. jade sexton. [applause] >> thank you, mr. speaker. with this issue, no young person is employable for the reasons for us was reasons against why they should or shouldn't be to make you in the coming year. the first one is obviously not people vote for us to be today also vote for this issue. this shows that they feel we have a parliament and to tackle what they seek is obviously an issue. and at the least supported by statistics statistics, which show youth unemployment is high and they are great between the years 2011 and 2012, even though there has been a decrease in octavo. if the opposition pointed out, this is probably the generation of the highest rate of unemployment. this was also pointed out that the rate increase, so does the level of health. with more young people participating to gain experience in a workplace environment. the question is, do we really need to increase the level of support for unemployed young people? is there support out there for them? is that not known where to go for help is available. in my school, we do work experience. it used to b
in germany had trained dogs on the street. there were no robberies or assaults because people know that the dog would get them. the security is not working. children and adults need to be protected. it would be safer to have trained dogs in every school and the malls and big theater complexes. host: we got your points. john fund. guest: i am not sure it would be less expensive to have a handle and a dog. i grew up much of my life in europe. i understand they have strict gun control laws there. the top three in terms of fatalities until friday were in britain and germany. those were often used with assault weapons. people can get access to these weapons. if you are a criminal or criminally insane, you do not care about the law. host: this comes from twitter. there were some graphics this morning from "the washington post." the ban on assault weapons includes massachusetts, maryland, new york, and hawaii. 30 states require -- every port of the mental health of buyers -- require a report of the mental health of buyers. what do you make of the mental health requirements and awaiting pe
a sense of europe. both peripheral countries as well as germany and finland. they all had a common view. they have got to find a way to work out all of their differences to save the euro. i believe they will. you can see it and feel it. they will find a way. they will muddle through, but they will find a way to get it done. these countries are also looking to us. we need to lead. europe shows us that this is the age of uncertainty. uncertainty leads business -- leaves the business is the sidelines. -- at the sidelines. they do not higher, especially with all that cash. confidence matters. we cannot leave people wondering what is coming down the pike. it especially matters in our economy. we need long-term fiscal reductions so people can pine for the future. we need to give families and businesses a certainty and the specific spending cuts specific revenue increases that reduce the deficit and avoid the fiscal cliff. we should not put out the hard decisions with gimmicks or triggers. that is what got us here in the first place. at this time to bite the bullet -- it is time to bite the bu
. in the new york times, a school is hit in the violence and school shortages worsening. in germany, the headline in the wall street journal, a popular german chancellor angela merkel launches a bid for a third term. we will hear from rick in lodi, california, a republican. caller: the disabilities act is a sham. i am in building construction,. works. they are already trying to come out with an international code book on disabilities. not going tos it's change the laws, and he is lying. host: you're talking about yesterday's debate in the senate. caller: exactly. i wish he would be as passionate about try to get people on the west coast back to work. if they would work as hard on that as the disabilities act, this country would not have the fiscal cliff because people would be working. everybody is always trying to blame the tea party. but tea party did not put this country in debt. but the party is trying to bring it to the attention of the people that these entitlements cannot be afforded any more. it is like your charge card. if you keep charging and taking and taking, pretty soo
war and why the economies of germany and japan took off after world war two. these conflicts destroy the network of interest groups that might have blocked growth and development. obviously, we don't want to have a war to clean out the interest groups system, but a political upheaval, a change in the party regime could accomplish that as it has done in the past. this is one of that contribution of americans party revolutions. the cleanup interest group systems and eliminate roadblocks, reform, expansion and dynamism. those are real advantages of the people. ladies and gentlemen, let's see what else i have here -- that is a chart on productivity. obviously, going down from the '50s and '60s, if we have a decline in work force in relation to people who are retired, he might wake up for that -- might wake up for that of the work force is productive. that is not really happen '90s and that usually attributed to the internet revolution. but that has burned off pretty quickly. that's a chart that shows that distribution of gdp by income groups and shows in the 1920's, the top 1% gain a dis
and one in germany. victor was awarded the bronze star by the united states for his committed meritorious service to his country during world war ii, a fitting honor for a patriot of victor's caliber. and this year on september 27, 2012, victor added another declaration when he was awarded the french legion of honor during a ceremony here in washington, d.c. at the french embassy. he was given the honor for his military service and helping to secure the liberation of france. the determination, bravery and selflessness of victor decarlo and so many like him is why we consider his generation the greatest. after the war, victor returned home, earning an engnoorg degree at tristate college in indiana and worked until his retirement at westinghouse in 1989. he and his wife have five children, 13 grandchildren and one greatgrandchild. i ask my colleagues to join me in celebrating an individual who is emblem attic of the greatest war, world war ii. it's truly an honor to slare victor's story with my colleagues again today. i want to commend victor decarlo for his commitment to his country and co
. >> more on life in soviet east germany, poland, and hungry from world war two to 1956. saturday night at 8:00 on c- span's q&a. the department of homeland security discussed the importance of strengthening in securing america's critical infrastructure against natural and man-made threats. they recognized the aging railroad networks and expressed the need to rebuild and sustain networks. this event is about 35 minutes. >> i have the honor and a pleasure to introduce suzanne spaulding. she is famous for her introductions. we will pale in comparison to . she oversees infrastructure protection and risk management and analysis. she will enhance the resilience of critical infrastructure. she had spent nearly 25 years working on national-security issues. she was a principal in the bingham consulting group. s house of rep. she has also spent six years at the central intelligence agency and served as senior counsel and legislative director for u.s. senator arlen specter. suzanne sent us a note. i will read the note. in that no she said, -- notes she said, family members may disagree on outcomes, bu
with a pulitzer prize winner on life in soviet east germany, poland, and hungary. from her historical narrative, send a night at 8:00 on c-span. >> "washington journal" continues. host: for the rest of the program, we are going to be talking more about the shooting yesterday in newtown, connecticut at the sandy hook elementary school. 27 victims including 20 children. we have broken down the phone numbers in terms of regions of the country. we have a special line for educators and administrators. if you work in education, give us a call and give us some of your thoughts as to what happened yesterday at the sandy hook elementary school in newtown, connecticut. we've got hte map up there which whos connecticut, hartford the capital. newtown in the southwest corner near the new york border. we will keep putting the numbers up on your screen. we want to show you the front page of the local newspaper. 20 children, six adults fatally shot. adam lanza was identified as the gunman. president obama addresses a grief-stricken nation. "our hearts are broken." showing a picture that has been on a lot of di
away the guns from the people in germany. you saw the results. host: what about other kinds of gun laws? you talked about farming and officer -- arming an officer, some type of official presence in schools, but what about a bill to ban assault weapons? caller: it used to be and i'm getting mixed -- are they going to bring up banning semi- automatic rifles? there were not been used in the crime, from what i understand. host: good morning to lois, a republican. caller: it is the people we have to worry about. it is mental illness. families recognize their children as they are growing up. if that could be curtailed, i know they would hate to put them in a mental institution. i would, too, because they love their child just the same. but those children that grow up with mental illness, it does not matter how they get it, they are going to get weapons of some sort. it is not the guns that the problem, it's the people. they have to collect those mentally ill people. host: would you lock them all up? caller: no. you hear about doctors. i don't know quite, but that is what the problem is, menta
since world war ii? i mean, i don't think germany's going to invade france any time soon or russia's going to invade poland. but yet we have a huge amount of deployed american forces in europe. i mean, maybe we need to have a discussion about whether or not we need that. whether or not we can afford that expense. whether or not that does anything to enhance our security. again, i want a military that is the best in the world, i want it to continue to be that way, i want it to be second to none. i want to make sure we have all that we need but i don't want to be investing in things we don't need. and when the joint chiefs of staff and when the secretary of defense and all the experts tell us that they don't need something and we here appropriate money to keep something going that is unnecessary, that is unwanted, at the same time while you're trying to cut the benefits of some poor old lady, her social security, there's something wrong with this equation. we got to start thinking about the security of people here in this country as well. and what we're going to do right after this i
telling the country of mexico if they would enter the war on the side of germany, the central powers, they would help mexico invade the united states and take the states of texas, new mexico, and arizona and give them to the country of mexico. so the united states entered the war on april 7, 1917. h.r. 3159 would create a commission to commemorate the 1th00 anniversary of world war i. over 116,000 americans died in world war i. that's more than in korea, vietnam, and both iraq wars and afghanistan combined. madam speaker, to my left is a photograph of american doughboys as they were called because of the color of their uniform, going over out of a trench over the top as it was called in world war i. primarily teenagers like most of our wars. the teenagers go to fight those wars. and they are leaving the trench going into what is called no man's land. those americans served along with their allies in world war ii. two u.s. presidents served in world war i, harry truman, dwight eisenhower. and if world war ii veterans were known as the greatest generation, then world war i veterans sho
on anyone? guest: the u.s. economy is still wobbly. southern europe is in a severe recession. germany and france are about to go in recession. when you have a shaky economy, piling on taxes does not work. spain's has been raising taxes. we have not seen anything like this with governments deliberately raising taxes on a scale since the early 1930's. they should be going in the opposite direction. they are putting more burdens on the private economies. host: somebody who may be in your income group wrote an op-ed about a month ago and this is part of it. i want to get your reaction. guest: in terms of income and what people effectively pay in tax rates, people and higher incomes pay effective tax rates three times those earning middle incomes in this country. salaried income versus capital gains gets confused. capital gains are no sure things. it is a high-risk proposition. there has always been a lower rate for capital gains. you would see this economy crater and hope of investment and go by the boards. bill clinton lowered the tax rates. to reverse that trend, that was a bad decade,
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